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Buy to let portfolio mortgages

By Lisa NichollsCeMAP

Last Reviewed: 31st May 2019

In October 2017, the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) made some changes to the way lenders view borrowers who have four or more buy to let properties.

Part of the Bank of England, the PRA regulate around 1,500 banks, building societies, insurers, credit unions and investment firms.

Changes have been made to ensure that lenders only offer buy to let mortgages to landlords who can comfortably afford them. This means that in the future, you may need to provide your lender with additional information about your current income, outgoings, assets and liabilities when applying for a buy to let mortgage.

So, whether you’re a first-time landlord looking to grow your portfolio, or you’re a seasoned buy to let investor, now’s the time to familiarise yourself with the new rules and regulations.

What is a portfolio landlord?

If you own four or more mortgaged buy to let properties, lenders will class you as a portfolio landlord. Always remember that lenders only take into account the number of properties you own. This means that if you have four or more rental properties, or if a new purchase will be your fourth one, mortgage lenders will still class you as a portfolio landlord.

This includes the following types of property:

  • Properties owned via a limited company
  • Consent to let properties
  • Holiday lets
  • All buy to let mortgages owned either solely or jointly

What differences are there for portfolio landlords?

When applying for a mortgage, you may need to provide extra information to your lender than you did before. This might include your current property portfolio and experience, as well as your assets and liabilities. Lenders may also want to see a business plan and cash flow statements for the properties you own.

Lenders will want to assess your personal income and expenditure including tax liability, living costs and essential expenses, as well as any other financial or credit commitments that you may have. In some cases, the process is now quite similar to a residential mortgage application.

It’s important to remember that lenders will also evaluate your rental income, especially if it is used as part of your personal income. Rental income is usually validated by comparing typical rents in the area, as well as local demand. Future rental income will be checked, too.

What is an Interest Coverage Ratio (ICR)?

Lenders work out ICR as a ratio of your expected monthly rental income from a buy to let property to the monthly interest payments, taking into account any likely future increases in interest rates.

This ratio is used to assess the debt you intend to take on. Lenders want to work out how easily you’ll be able to pay it back using the rental income from your new property alone. If it won’t bring in enough income, your lender won’t grant you a buy to let portfolio mortgage on rental income alone.

However, it is also possible to apply to use your personal income, as well as your potential rental income when taking out a new buy to let mortgage. This will be considered in circumstances where there is a shortfall in the required rental income received from your buy to let property to meet the minimum ICR rate.

Got a few questions about buy to let portfolio mortgages?

The new rules around buy to let mortgages can be difficult to get your head around at first, but you’ll feel much more confident once you’re in the know.

Planning on applying for a new buy to let mortgage in the near future? Talk to us if you’d like to know what you need to have in place.

If you have any questions about but to let portfolio mortgages, Call us today on 01925 906210. One of our advisors can talk through all of your options with you.

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